Nuisance Dogs & Cats

Under the Companion Animals Act 1998 a dog is a nuisance dog if it:
•consistently roams; or
•makes persistent, excessive noise; or
•repeatedly defecates on private property other than the property on which it is ordinarily kept; or
•repeatedly runs at or chases a person, animal (other than vermin or in the course of droving, tending, working or protecting livestock) or vehicle; or
•endangers the health of a person or animal (other than vermin or in the course of droving, tending, working or protecting livestock); or
•repeatedly causes substantial damage to anything outside the property on which it is ordinarily kept. 
   
 Noise from Barking Dogs:
Complaints about barking dogs are one of the most common calls made to Council's Rangers. Many pet owners are not aware that, while they are not at home, their dog may be a nuisance and disturbing the neighbours. According to the Companion Animals Act 1998, a dog is a nuisance if the dog:

"makes a noise, by barking or otherwise, that persistently occurs or continues to such a degree or extent that it unreasonably interferes with the peace, comfort or convenience of any person in any other premises".

Chronic or excessive barking is a sign that something is wrong and can be a nuisance to others in the community. Sometimes stopping a dog from barking can be as simple as taking care of their basic needs.

Owners of dogs have responsibilities under the Companion Animals Act 1998 and the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997 - to ensure their dogs do not exhibit nuisance behaviour or emit offensive noise.